Happy Holidays from BILD!

Happy holidays from the team at BILD headquarters! To end our big year of blogging, tweeting, meeting, and Facebooking (all in the name of community BILDing!), here’s a festive post of some of our Christmas wishes (and a picture from our end-of-year festive gathering).

Here’s what we’d ask Santa for, if Santa gave gifts (or granted wishes) of the critical sociolinguistics variety:

  • A special Montreal Scrabble game with all the tiles you’d need to play bilingually in French AND English.
  • A better concept of “fluency” (we often hear students say they can’t speak English, or don’t speak well, or aren’t fluent, not realizing that fluency is all in the eye of the beholder! So this wish would be to measure ourselves based on what we want to achieve/how far we’ve come instead of comparing ourselves to the “unicorn of fluency”.
  • A voice in the new Cabinet arguing irrefutably and SUCCESSFULLY for new, more than adequate funding for Aboriginal language activist work AND for Heritage Language teaching/learning support in Canada. It’s about time.
  • For children in all classrooms and communities to have more opportunities to read and explore diverse children’s literature, including multilingual books, poetry and stories reflecting the richness and complexities of our world. A library and a librarian in every school, comfortable and peaceful places for children to learn about the world through stories. Support for public libraries with multilingual children’s books.
  • The opportunity to talk to and understand people from every nation in all the languages, appreciate all our different cultures and communicate with one another with complete openness, acceptance, appreciation and respect for our differences.
  • Closer ties between the ideas we talk about and research with passion and educational practices (e.g., moving beyond the L1-L2 dichotomy).
  • A tank of real Babelfish (like the ones in Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy)!
  • A spell-checker that supports the use of multiple languages at once (so you can use two or more languages at a time, without having to choose one language only, which renders all the words in the other language wrong)

And, just for fun, here are some of our favourite holiday movies, in no particular order:

  • A Charlie Brown Christmas
  • It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, with Jimmy Stewart).
  • Love, Actually
  • National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation
  • Die Hard
  • Love Actually
  • Elf
  • The Polar Express
  • Let it Snow
  • Holiday Inn
  • L’arbre de Noel
  • The Snowman
  • Christmas Story
  • The Family Stone
  • Joyeux Noel

… and some of our favourite holiday carols (also in no particular order):

  • Pretty Paper (the Roy Orbison version, for sure!)
  • In dulce jubilo (a TRANSLANGUAGED carol!)
  • L’enfant au tambour
  • The North Wind (an Australian Christmas Carol)
  • Carol of the Bells
  • Chapleau fait son Jour de l’An
  • O Holy Night
  • Carry Me Home (by Canadian band Hey Rosetta!)
  • Douce nuit
  • Mon beau sapin
  • The Twelve Days of Christmas
  • White Christmas
  • How to Make Gravy (by Australian singer Paul Kelly)
  • Minuit chrétien
  • Silver Bells
  • White Wine in the Sun (by Australian singer Tim Minchin)

You can listen to this carefully curated list on our very own BILD Christmas playlist below!

What would be on your critical sociolinguistics wish list? Share in the comments below, and/or just for fun, tell us your favourite Christmas movies and carols!

Feliz Navidad!  Joyeux Noël! Merry Christmas! Frohe Weihnachten! Thanks for reading, and see you in the new year!

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